Childre Nissan Compares 2013 Nissan Rogue VS 2013 Hyundai Tucson Near Warner Robins, GA

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2013 Nissan Rogue

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VS

2013 Hyundai Tucson

Safety Comparison

For enhanced safety, the front and rear seat shoulder belts of the Nissan Rogue are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Hyundai Tucson has only front height-adjustable seat belts.

The Rogue SL has a standard Around View ® Monitor to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Tucson only offers a rear monitor.

Both the Rogue and the Tucson have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available all-wheel drive.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Nissan Rogue is safer than the Hyundai Tucson:

Rogue

Tucson

Driver

STARS

4 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

191

280

Neck Injury Risk

30%

43%

Neck Stress

310 lbs.

440 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Nissan Rogue is safer than the Hyundai Tucson:

Rogue

Tucson

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Chest Movement

.6 inches

1.2 inches

Abdominal Force

174 G’s

207 G’s

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

198

214

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

18 inches

19 inches

HIC

188

444

Spine Acceleration

38 G’s

43 G’s

Hip Force

653 lbs.

767 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Warranty Comparison

There are over 86 percent more Nissan dealers than there are Hyundai dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Rogue’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

A reliable vehicle saves its owner time, money and trouble. Nobody wants to be stranded or have to be without their vehicle while it’s being repaired. Consumer Reports predicts that the Rogue’s reliability will be 30% better than the Tucson.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2012 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Nissan vehicles are better in initial quality than Hyundai vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Nissan 12th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 8 more problems per 100 vehicles, Hyundai is ranked 18th, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

The Rogue’s 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 5 more horsepower (170 vs. 165) and 29 lbs.-ft. more torque (175 vs. 146) than the Tucson GL’s standard 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. The Rogue’s 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 7 lbs.-ft. more torque (175 vs. 168) than the Tucson GLS/Limited’s standard 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

As tested in Motor Trend the Nissan Rogue is faster than the Tucson GLS/Limited 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. (automatics tested):

Rogue

Tucson

Zero to 60 MPH

8 sec

9.8 sec

Quarter Mile

16.2 sec

17.4 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

86.2 MPH

81.7 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Rogue gets better fuel mileage than the Tucson:

Rogue

Tucson

2WD

n/a

20 city/26 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Manual

n/a

22 city/29 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Auto

2.5 4 cyl./Auto

23 city/28 hwy

21 city/30 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

4WD

2.5 4 cyl./Auto

22 city/27 hwy

20 city/27 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Rogue’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the Tucson AWD are solid, not vented.

The Rogue stops shorter than the Tucson:

Rogue

Tucson

70 to 0 MPH

178 feet

180 feet

Car and Driver

Suspension and Handling Comparison

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Rogue’s wheelbase is 2 inches longer than on the Tucson (105.9 inches vs. 103.9 inches).

The Rogue SL AWD handles at .79 G’s, while the Tucson Limited AWD pulls only .77 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Rogue SL executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver quicker than the Tucson GLS (28.4 seconds @ .58 average G’s vs. 28.8 seconds @ .56 average G’s).

For greater off-road capability the Rogue has a 1.6 inches greater minimum ground clearance than the Tucson (8.3 vs. 6.7 inches), allowing the Rogue to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged.

Chassis Comparison

As tested by Car and Driver, the interior of the Rogue SL AWD is quieter than the Tucson Limited AWD:

Rogue

Tucson

Full-Throttle

74 dB

77 dB

70 MPH Cruising

69 dB

72 dB

Passenger Space Comparison

The Rogue has 1 inch more front headroom and .4 inches more front legroom than the Tucson.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Rogue has a much larger cargo area with its rear seat up than the Tucson with its rear seat up (28.9 vs. 25.7 cubic feet). The Rogue has a much larger cargo area with its rear seat folded than the Tucson with its rear seat folded (57.9 vs. 55.8 cubic feet).

The Rogue’s cargo area is larger than the Tucson’s in almost every dimension:

Rogue

Tucson

Length to seat (2nd/1st)

36.3”/72”

34.5”/67.2”

Max Width

55”

50.7”

Min Width

42.5”

40”

Height

32.5”

32.5”

Ergonomics Comparison

The Rogue’s driver’s power window opens or closes with one touch of the window control, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths. The Tucson’s standard driver’s power window switch has to be held the entire time to close it fully.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the Rogue owner. The Car Book by Jack Gillis rates the Rogue with a number “5” insurance rate while the Tucson is rated higher at a number “8” rate.

The Rogue will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. Kiplinger’s estimates that the Rogue will retain a greater percentage of its original price after two and four years than the Tucson.

Rogue

Tucson

Four Year

39% to 40%

31%

Two Year

55% to 56%

45% to 46%

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Rogue is less expensive to operate than the Tucson because it costs $210 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost less on the Rogue than the Tucson, including $102 less for a water pump and $103 less for a fuel pump.

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