Childre Nissan Compares 2017 Nissan Rogue VS 2016 Mitsubishi Outlander Near Dublin, GA

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2017 Nissan Rogue

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VS

2016 Mitsubishi Outlander

Safety Comparison

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The Rogue SL offers optional Forward Emergency Braking, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Outlander Sport doesn't offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the Rogue AWD’s standard Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

The Rogue SL’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Rogue (except S) offers an optional Around View® Monitor to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Outlander Sport only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

The Rogue SV/SL’s blind spot warning system uses digital cameras monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Rogue SV/SL’s cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Rogue SL has standard NissanConnect, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Rogue and the Outlander Sport have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available all-wheel drive.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Nissan Rogue is safer than the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport:

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

 

Driver

STARS

4 Stars

4 Stars

Neck Stress

284 lbs.

412 lbs.

Neck Compression

44 lbs.

90 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Nissan Rogue is safer than the Outlander Sport:

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Restraints

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Max Chest Compression

27 cm

28 cm

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

1.9/.2 kN

3.43/.93 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

1%/0%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Tibia index R/L

.46/.37

.68/.36

Tibia forces R/L

1.3/.6 kN

1.9/1.9 kN

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH, results indicate that the Nissan Rogue is safer than the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport:

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

69

163

Hip Force

477 lbs.

518 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

142

349

Hip Force

783 lbs.

794 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Rogue the rating of “Top Pick” for 2016, a rating granted to only 102 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Outlander Sport is not a “Top Pick” for 2016.

Warranty Comparison

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The Rogue’s corrosion warranty is unlimited miles longer than the Outlander Sport’s (unlimited vs. 100,000 miles).

There are over 82 percent more Nissan dealers than there are Mitsubishi dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Rogue’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

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J.D. Power and Associates’ 2016 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Nissan vehicles are better in initial quality than Mitsubishi vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Nissan 10th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 15 more problems per 100 vehicles, Mitsubishi is ranked 20th, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

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The Rogue’s standard 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 22 more horsepower (170 vs. 148) and 30 lbs.-ft. more torque (175 vs. 145) than the Outlander Sport’s standard 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. The Rogue’s 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl. produces 2 more horsepower (170 vs. 168) and 8 lbs.-ft. more torque (175 vs. 167) than the Outlander Sport’s optional 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl. The Rogue Hybrid’s standard 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. hybrid produces 8 more horsepower (176 vs. 168) than the Outlander Sport’s optional 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

As tested in Motor Trend the Nissan Rogue 4 cyl. is faster than the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport 2.0 DOHC 4 cyl. (automatics tested):

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

Zero to 60 MPH

9.1 sec

10.1 sec

Quarter Mile

17 sec

17.7 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

83.2 MPH

78.4 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

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On the EPA test cycle the Rogue Hybrid gets better fuel mileage than the Outlander Sport:

 

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

 

FWD

n/a

23 city/29 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Manual

 

2.0 4 cyl./CVT

33 city/35 hwy

24 city/30 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Auto

AWD

2.0 4 cyl./CVT

31 city/34 hwy

23 city/29 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Auto

On the EPA test cycle the Rogue gets better fuel mileage than the Outlander Sport:

 

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

 

2WD

2.5 4 cyl./CVT

26 city/33 hwy

24 city/30 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Auto

 

 

n/a

23 city/28 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

4WD

2.5 4 cyl./CVT

25 city/32 hwy

23 city/29 hwy

2.0 4 cyl./Auto

 

n/a

22 city/27 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Rogue Hybrid’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

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For better stopping power the Rogue’s front brake rotors are larger than those on the Outlander Sport:

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

Front Rotors

11.84 inches

11.6 inches

The Rogue’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the Outlander Sport are solid, not vented.

The Rogue stops shorter than the Outlander Sport:

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

 

60 to 0 MPH

118 feet

125 feet

Motor Trend

60 to 0 MPH (Wet)

142 feet

143 feet

Consumer Reports

Tires and Wheels Comparison

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For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Rogue SL offers optional 19-inch wheels. The Outlander Sport’s largest wheels are only 18-inches.

The Rogue has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Changing a flat tire near traffic can be dangerous and inconvenient. The run-flat tires available on the Rogue can be driven up to 50 miles without any air pressure, allowing you to drive to a service station for a repair. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer run-flat tires.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

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The Rogue has vehicle speed sensitive variable-assist power steering, for low-effort parking, better control at highway speeds and during hard cornering, and a better feel of the road. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer variable-assist power steering.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Rogue’s wheelbase is 1.4 inches longer than on the Outlander Sport (106.5 inches vs. 105.1 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Rogue is 2.2 inches wider in the front and 2.2 inches wider in the rear than on the Outlander Sport.

The Rogue SL AWD handles at .77 G’s, while the Outlander Sport 4WD pulls only .76 G’s of cornering force in a Motor Trend skidpad test.

Chassis Comparison

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To almost totally eliminate engine vibration in the passenger area, the Rogue has an electronically controlled liquid-filled front engine mount. A computer controlled electric current in the liquid changes its viscosity, allowing the mount to dampen the engine completely at all RPMs. The Outlander Sport uses conventional solid rubber engine mounts.

Passenger Space Comparison

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The Rogue offers optional seating for 7 passengers; the Outlander Sport can only carry 5.

The Rogue has 29 cubic feet more passenger volume than the Outlander Sport (126.5 vs. 97.5).

The Rogue has 2.2 inches more front headroom, 1.4 inches more front legroom, 1.9 inches more front hip room, .4 inches more front shoulder room, .6 inches more rear headroom, 1.6 inches more rear legroom, .5 inches more rear hip room and .4 inches more rear shoulder room than the Outlander Sport.

For enhanced passenger comfort on long trips the Rogue’s available middle row seats recline. The Outlander Sport’s rear seats don’t recline.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

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The Rogue’s cargo area provides more volume than the Outlander Sport.

 

Rogue

Outlander Sport

Third Seat Removed

32 cubic feet

21.7 cubic feet

Second Seat Folded

70 cubic feet

49.5 cubic feet

To make loading and unloading groceries and cargo easier when your hands are full, the Rogue’s cargo door can be opened just by waving your foot, leaving your hands completely free. The Rogue also (except S) offers an optional power cargo door, which opens and closes automatically by pressing a button or just by waving your foot. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a power or hands-free opening cargo door.

Ergonomics Comparison

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When different drivers share the Rogue SL, the memory seats and mirrors make it convenient. Each setting activates different, customized memories for the driver’s seat position and outside mirror angle. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a memory system.

If the windows are left down on the Rogue the driver can raise them all using the key in the outside lock cylinder; on a hot day the driver can lower the windows. The driver of the Outlander Sport can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

The Outlander Sport’s power locks don’t automatically lock the doors. The Rogue’s standard power locks automatically lock the doors when a certain speed is reached. This is an important feature for occupant safety. Locked doors are proven to open less often in collisions, and they are also effective in preventing crime at traffic lights. (The power lock’s automatic feature may have to be activated by your dealer.)

To improve rear visibility by keeping the rear window clear, the Rogue has a standard rear fixed intermittent wiper with a full on position. The rear wiper standard on the Outlander Sport only has an intermittent setting, so in a hard rain visibility isn’t as good.

While driving with high beams on, sensitive light sensors standard on the Rogue SL detect other vehicles which could be blinded and automatically switch to low beams. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer automatic dimming high beams.

To shield the driver and front passenger’s vision over a larger portion of the windshield and side windows, the Rogue has standard extendable sun visors. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer extendable visors.

On extremely cold Winter days, the Rogue’s optional (except S) heated steering wheel provides comfort, allowing the driver to steer safely and comfortably before the vehicle heater warms up. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer a heated steering wheel.

The Rogue SV/SL’s standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer dual zone air conditioning.

Both the Rogue and the Outlander Sport offer rear vents. For greater rear passenger comfort, the Rogue has standard rear air conditioning vents to keep rear occupants cool in summer or warm in winter. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer rear air conditioning vents, only heat vents.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the Rogue SL offers an optional Intelligent Cruise Control, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

Standard NissanConnect for the Rogue allows the driver and passengers access to select programs on their smartphones, including reading text messages aloud, playing internet radio stations, searching the internet and other connected activities without taking their eyes off the road or their hands from the wheel. The Outlander Sport doesn’t offer factory integrated smartphone program access.

Economic Advantages Comparison

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Insurance will cost less for the Rogue owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the Rogue will cost $235 to $1555 less than the Outlander Sport over a five-year period.

The Rogue will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The IntelliChoice estimates that the Rogue will retain 48.99% to 50.37% of its original price after five years, while the Outlander Sport only retains 41.04% to 42.03%.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Rogue is less expensive to operate than the Outlander Sport because typical repairs cost much less on the Rogue than the Outlander Sport, including $191 less for a water pump, $122 less for front brake pads, $530 less for a starter, $33 less for a fuel pump and $285 less for front struts.

IntelliChoice estimates that five-year ownership costs (depreciation, financing, insurance, fuel, fees, repairs and maintenance) for the Nissan Rogue will be $268 to $437 less than for the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport.

Recommendations Comparison

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Consumer Reports® recommends the Nissan Rogue, based on reliability, safety and performance. The Mitsubishi Outlander Sport isn't recommended.

Strategic Vision rates overall owner satisfaction with vehicle quality. The Nissan Rogue is ranked above average in the Entry CUV category. The Mitsubishi Outlander Sport is ranked below average.

The Nissan Rogue outsold the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport by over nine to one during the 2016 model year.

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