Childre Nissan Compares 2018 Nissan Murano VS 2018 Subaru Outback Near Warner Robins, GA

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2018 Nissan Murano

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VS

2018 Subaru Outback

Safety Comparison

The Murano SL/Platinum has a standard Around View® Monitor to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Outback only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

The Murano (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Outback doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Murano and the Outback have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all wheel drive, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Nissan Murano is safer than the Subaru Outback:

 

Murano

Outback

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Nissan Murano is safer than the Subaru Outback:

 

Murano

Outback

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Abdominal Force

162 G’s

192 G’s

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

212

223

Spine Acceleration

38 G’s

51 G’s

Hip Force

330 lbs.

527 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Spine Acceleration

39 G’s

40 G’s

Hip Force

681 lbs.

736 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Warranty Comparison

There are over 71 percent more Nissan dealers than there are Subaru dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Murano’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2017 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Nissan vehicles are better in initial quality than Subaru vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Nissan 10th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 20 more problems per 100 vehicles, Subaru is ranked 25th, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

The Murano’s 3.5 DOHC V6 produces 85 more horsepower (260 vs. 175) and 66 lbs.-ft. more torque (240 vs. 174) than the Outback 2.5i’s standard 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl. The Murano’s 3.5 DOHC V6 produces 4 more horsepower (260 vs. 256) than the Outback 3.6R’s standard 3.6 DOHC 6 cyl.

As tested in Motor Trend the Nissan Murano is faster than the Outback 2.5i:

 

Murano

Outback

Zero to 60 MPH

7.4 sec

9.5 sec

Quarter Mile

15.6 sec

17.4 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

91.8 MPH

82.1 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Murano AWD gets better fuel mileage than the Outback 3.6R (21 city/28 hwy vs. 20 city/27 hwy).

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Murano’s brake rotors are larger than those on the Outback:

 

Murano

Outback

Front Rotors

12.6 inches

12.4 inches

Rear Rotors

12.1 inches

11.8 inches

The Murano stops much shorter than the Outback:

 

Murano

Outback

 

60 to 0 MPH

115 feet

129 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Murano has larger tires than the Outback (235/65R18 vs. 225/65R17).

The Murano’s optional tires provide better handling because they have a lower 55 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Outback Limited/Touring’s 60 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Murano has standard 18-inch wheels. Smaller 17-inch wheels are standard on the Outback 2.5i/2.5i Premium. The Murano’s optional 20-inch wheels are larger than the 18-inch wheels on the Outback Limited/Touring.

The Murano has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The Outback doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Murano’s wheelbase is 3.1 inches longer than on the Outback (111.2 inches vs. 108.1 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Murano is 2.8 inches wider in the front and 2.4 inches wider in the rear than on the Outback.

The Murano Platinum AWD handles at .82 G’s, while the Outback 3.6R Limited pulls only .76 G’s of cornering force in a Motor Trend skidpad test.

The Murano Platinum AWD executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver quicker than the Outback 2.5i Limited (27.8 seconds @ .64 average G’s vs. 28.4 seconds @ .57 average G’s).

Passenger Space Comparison

The Murano has 1.4 inches more front shoulder room, .9 inches more rear headroom, .6 inches more rear legroom, .2 inches more rear hip room and 1.5 inches more rear shoulder room than the Outback.

The front step up height for the Murano is 3.2 inches lower than the Outback (15.8” vs. 19”). The Murano’s rear step up height is 3.9 inches lower than the Outback’s (15.1” vs. 19”).

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Murano’s cargo area is larger than the Outback’s in almost every dimension:

 

Murano

Outback

Length to seat (2nd/1st)

37”/74.4”

41.8”/77.7”

Max Width

54”

50.5”

Min Width

45”

42”

Height

33.7”

33”

Pressing a switch automatically raises the Murano Platinum’s rear seats, to make changing between cargo and passengers easier. The Outback doesn’t offer automatic folding seats.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Murano SL/Platinum’s standard easy entry system raises the steering wheel and glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Outback doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The Murano’s front power windows open or close fully with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The Outback’s standard passenger windows don’t open or close automatically.

If the front windows are left open on the Murano the driver can close them at the outside door handle. On a hot day the driver can lower the windows at the outside door handle or from a distance using the keyless remote. The driver of the Outback can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

The Murano SV/SL/Platinum’s standard wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The Outback’s manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

When the Murano SL/Platinum is put in reverse, both rearview mirrors tilt from their original position. This gives the driver a better view of the curb during parallel parking maneuvers. Shifting out of reverse puts the mirrors into their original positions. The Outback’s mirrors don’t automatically adjust for backing.

Standard air-conditioned seats in the Murano Platinum keep the driver and front passenger comfortable and take the sting out of hot seats in Summer. The Outback doesn’t offer air-conditioned seats.

The Murano has a standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. Dual zone air conditioning is only available on the Outback Premium/Limited/Touring.

Both the Murano and the Outback offer rear vents. For greater rear passenger comfort, the Murano has standard rear air conditioning vents to keep rear occupants cool in summer or warm in winter. The Outback Base/Premium doesn’t offer rear air conditioning vents, only heat vents.

Economic Advantages Comparison

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Murano is less expensive to operate than the Outback because it costs $540 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost much less on the Murano than the Outback, including $103 less for a starter and $274 less for front struts.

Recommendations Comparison

Consumer Reports® recommends both the Nissan Murano and the Subaru Outback, based on reliability, safety and performance.

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